Archive for the 'Videos: Openings' Category

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Hello Athens. The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad.

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Having covered the Sydney and Beijing games already, it seems only fair to fill in the blank that is Athens 2004. These two videos, produced for the Seven Network and the Athens Olympic Broadcasting organisation respectively, prove that the timeless formula of “athletes + cultural imagery = Olympic opener” will apparently never go out of fashion.

- Another big thanks to Christian for the videos.

Hello Sydney. The Games of the XXVII Olympiad.

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These two opening titles for the Sydney 2000 games (aka “the best Olympics games ever“) show just how little creative progress has been made in the field of Olympic television branding. And while they’re not bad, you have to wonder how many more Olympics broadcasts are going to open with video of a guy jumping up and kicking a soccer ball before somebody thinks up a new idea.

The first video is from the Seven network, the Australian broadcaster of the 2000 games, and the second video is the “official” opening sequence, produced by the Sydney Olympic Broadcasting Organisation for international telecasts.

- Huge thanks to Alex and Christian for the videos.

The Olympics on Germany’s ZDF.

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Germany’s ZDF (aka Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen) combines the Chinese landscape with Olympic athleticism, along with the obligatory cultural reference in the form of a flying dragon for this slick branding of their Games coverage.

- Big thanks to Ulrich for the video.

The Olympics on Norway’s NRK.

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Olympics broadcast branding has been a bucket full of cliches so far. And while the BBC’s incredibly unique take on the Games has been a much needed dose of fresh air, Norway’s national broadcaster NRK have delivered a nice spin on the usual slow motion althetes imagery with this Heroes-meets-300 inspired spot.

- Thanks to Hans for the video.

The official opening sequence of the Olympics.

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UPDATE: Added the “making of” video above.

Designed by BDA Singapore, this is the “official opening title sequence to the Beijing Olympic Games 2008″. Official because its the sequence used by Beijing Olympic Broadcasting, the host broadcaster of the games set up to provide television signals of the games to the rest of the world.

The video is a combination of live action and 3D animation, and is based around the “Chinese elements of nature – metal, wood, water, fire & earth”.

Read more about the spot here and here, and thanks to Nick for the video.

The Olympics on Australia’s Seven Network.

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The Opening Ceremony may still be a day away, but the first event is about to start in the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, which means coverage has begun, and the full Olympic look of Australia’s Seven Network is being rolled out.

The BBC have taken a very unique approach to their Olympics branding, as you’ll see above Seven have stuck with the traditional “gold-infused slow-motion footage of athletes” imagery that seems to be the norm, albeit executed in a very slick fashion.

More Olympics coverage to come throughout the Games.

And the nominees for Main Title Design are..

UPDATE: And the Emmy goes to Mad Men. The full list of winners is available here.

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The nominees for the 2008 Primetime Emmy Award for Main Title Design have been announced, last year Dexter won, and in the running for it this year:

> Advertising drama Mad Men from AMC
> HBO telemovie Bernard and Doris
> Geek action hero Chuck on NBC
> CIA miniseries The Company
> And cancelled Fox series New Amsterdam

For all the details on who made what, check out this. And the winner will be announced at the Creative Arts ceremony on September 13th.

Darkly dreaming of the dearly devoted Dexter.

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Did you know there was an Emmy for best main title design? One company that knows all about it is Digital Kitchen, who in 2002 won for their stunning work on the Six Feet Under opener, and scored big again last year with the titles for Dexter.

Dexter made its free to air debut in Australia this week, but both seasons were already over with on subscription television, with Foxtel’s new Showcase channel launching itself on the back of everyone’s favourite serial killer.

I watched both seasons of Dexter over summer, and became enthralled with the adventures of the dysfunctional Dexter Morgan, which brings me to my question..

Why didn’t Ten just pick this up in the first place? Free to air television isn’t exactly proving its relevance by letting Dexter (and others) make their debuts on pay TV.

BBC News 24 is no more.

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More of the white space infused refresh of the BBC’s news output, including the new BBC News Channel, BBC News at 10, and regional BBC News service Points West.

The BBC have actually blogged about the changes themselves here and here, and have also compiled a video montage of the look of BBC News over the years here.

Among other things they explain the dropping of the 24 from their news channel:

BBC News 24 becomes simply “BBC News”… The channel is not just at the heart of BBC News. Now it is BBC News.

For videos from the newly renamed BBC World News channel click here.

- Thanks for the videos Craig.

Name changes for BBC World and BBC News 24.

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In a branding move where apparently “more is more” the BBC’s international news channel, BBC World will change its name tomorrow to BBC World News.

Proving its ability at being truly impartial however, the Beeb is giving BBC News 24 a facelift as well, this time taking the “less is more” approach by dropping the 24 from its name and relaunching as simple BBC News.

Along with the new names will come a new look designed by Lambie-Nairn.

For now though, a look back at the old branding, with videos from BBC News 24 and BBC World, on the eve of their rebrand. And for more from BBC News have a look at their earlier looks from 2006 and 2007.

- Thanks for the BBC News 24 videos Craig.